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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the country. that will dry up. we are committed to making penn affordable for the undergraduates which costs $181 million a year. that's twice the amount it costs us eight years august because we ramped up financial aid, and the more unemployment terrorist in the country, the more we spend on financial aid, and it would be a tragedy if the country moved in a direction to make education less affordable so, we, as a university, are very dependent and very concerned about the fiscal health of the country. >> host: are you also in the classroom here at the university? >> guest: i do enjoy teaching, and i take every opportunity to meet with students to tox r talk to students and teach in the spare time. >> host: what does a provost do, and how long were you at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years from the time i got my ph.d. to the time i came to penn, and i was deep of the faculty at simpson since the chief academic and chief financial officer at princeton so the provost works closely with the president. >> host: what's the learning curve on being a president of the university? >
it in the book. it was made by irving penn, the great 20th century portrait photographer verboten magazine and actually appeared in "vogue" magazine, although it took me several months to figure out exactly when and where.ccc any event committee was madecc in 1951, so it hasn't been seenc about six decades since the last photograph of rachel carson. by far the best photographs of her ever taken. she would've been 44 years old in this photograph and i just think it's terrific. penn actually shot it this way. it's not cropped. that's the way he photographed. looking around this audience tonight, i suspect most of you know who rachel carson is, but i can tell you generally that is not the case with a lot of people. baby boomers and people older than baby researcher amber carson and her work and young people in high school and college are studying rachel carson again in environmental studies classes and they are more likely to know who person was. but in between is a great doughnut hole. i thought that people don't don't know rachel carson, don't know "silent spring" and as a result don't
at the university of penn, what is your reaction to the photographer? what do you say? >> my reaction to the photographer is my reaction to all the photographs that appear in my book that depict pictures of war, pictures of terror, pictures of natural disaster. all of which have been capsized in this moment of people facing death, and my argument has long been that if they're willing to read the news about these events, we should be willing to see the pictures of these events the pictures do different things, but there are no less important as vehicles of affirmation relayed and other words. so as long as we keep saying, i want to know about this event, but i don't want to see pictures about it, we are not privileging , not excepting, not recognizing how images bring us into the news in a way that is different from words. >> well, someone argue that this image we are about to show here in about to die is very different than an image of a man on a train track are a woman jumping out of a building. what are we seeing here? >> we are seeing here is a kevin carter image that was taken in
crisis, the commercial paper prices, penn central and other. goldman got into trouble than for selling bonds for full value. and so they pulled back. the policies, ranging price controls. and it wasn't until finally and again under pressure from the germans in particular, volker understood that one had to break american labor in order to stabilize. we interviewed him. and he said, very interestingly, the more important than what i do in raising interest rates to 18% to drive up unemployment high was in. [inaudible] more important and that was the air traffic controllers' strike. nixon's breaking of the union. it was very interesting that he was said that. a very explicit. question i raise another dimension of the politics that i think, where we're going. and that has to do with how labor was responding to all of this. and to understand that you have to go back to 1945. and labor was very strong coming of the war. and the question was, where with lipper go? with labor move toward challenging capitalism jack would it talk about democratizing the economy, talk about controlling finance, c
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)